Trying too hard: how to spot contrived authority

IMG_5007

 

Recently I came home to find this rather loud notice (above) wedged in the side of my front door. I read it with a mixture of laughter and nagging concern at a rubbish dump in close proximity to our house stinking up the area. My favourite part was, “If you smell something, say something…” I wonder if Crime Stoppers know their slogan is being ripped off.

It all sounded very official. It had big aggressive font and highly emotive language designed to scare people into action and motivate them to join this group in making a change.

But what was this group? It didn’t state exactly, but if I had have gone along to this ‘community meeting’ like the pamphlet was urging me so strongly to do, I most likely would have found a group of people with a lot of rage but zero tangible authority.

 

IMG_5009.jpg

 

Now this second photo is of a parking infringement notice. Admittedly, it’s bright yellow so I could spot it on my windscreen when I got back to the train station after a nine hour shift, but it is less than half the size of the community notice about the tip. It is a small notice, full of little words.

There’s a reason the tip notice made me laugh, while the parking ticket nearly made me cry.

This parking ticket didn’t need to make a big hoo-ha. Why? Because it was backed with the full weight and authority of the Victorian government and the laws of Australia. Why can one person arrest a group of brawling criminals just because they’re wearing a blue uniform? It’s not the person; it’s the group that they represent.

My point is that when you possess genuine authority, you don’t need to go about lording your power over all the people around you. That notice about the stinky tip had no authority, so out of insecurity had to drum some up. I wonder how many people showed up to that meeting? I bet less than those who didn’t pay their parking fines this month (I hope).

When we try to assert power in our own strength, it will always be striving. What God wants for us is to recognise the authority that He has given us as Christians, through the grace of Jesus Christ. The devil can’t take our godly authority away.

The only things he can do are:

1) Lie – tell us we have no real authority and hope that we will believe it.

2) Accuse – remind us of all the bad things we’ve done and make a very convincing case as to why that excludes us from accessing God’s power and blessing – that we are no longer His legitimate children.

 

Then Jesus came to them and said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me.  Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.

  • Matthew 28:18-20 (NIV)

 

So next time you feel the urge to prove yourself, to defend the position you have in Christ, remember this.

 

Since, then, you have been raised with Christ, set your hearts on things above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God.

  • Colossians 3:1 (NIV)

 

Real delegated biblical authority doesn’t need to scream and shout. It doesn’t need the CAPS LOCK function or to italics, bold or underline its words. It just is. Because it can’t be taken away.

Just like Christ’s authority.

Don’t feel like you have to trick people into believing in God or jazz up the gospel to make it sound more user friendly. The authority it holds is enough, because God never breaks his word and he watches over it to accomplish it (Jeremiah 1:12). There is power in your words – in telling people the amazing things that Jesus has done in your life. And there is authority in his name.

So instead of struggling for power and respect from everyone, just keep listening to the Father’s voice and doing what he says.

 

Jesus said, “I only do what I see my Father do; I only say what I hear my Father say.”

  • John 5:19 (NIV)

 

If it’s good enough for him, it should be good enough for us.

After all, if your dad’s the king, you don’t have to try to prove your royal blood lines. You just walk in his footsteps and people will see the resemblance.
Sincerely,
Lil

Advertisements

5 Tips To Choosing The Perfect Wedding Stationery

A blog I’ve written for work lately – a guest post on Snug Harbour. Hope you enjoy it!

Celebrate at Snug Harbor

Want to make sure you nail it with your wedding stationery? Of course you do! Since we’re the experts in this area, we can help. Here are five tips and tricks to getting it right for your special day.

1. Consider the style and season of your wedding

Screen Shot 2018-06-02 at 4.25.28 PM

Wedding stationery should ideally follow a similar theme – although it doesn’t have to be too matchy matchy if you’re not into that. Are you hosting a beautiful spring wedding? Consider soft greens, brilliant blues and florals on white backgrounds. A winter wedding more what you had in mind? Why not try real gold foil or letterpress on crisp black card, or rich tones like burgundy, forest green and navy paired with white or silver. The bridal party’s attire can also inform the stationery’s colour palette.

2. Consider your budget

Screen Shot 2018-06-02 at 4.25.35 PM

It’s sad but true – your budget should never be too far…

View original post 499 more words

His Ways Are Higher

You will be praised

His ways are higher than my own // His thoughts consume the great unknown.

-Hillsong

My fiancé Jacques and I have been in a long distance relationship for over a year now. We have known each other for over two years but to date have only spent 10 weeks in each other’s company. We plan to get married, so in November last year (after saving money for over eight months) we applied for a visa to allow Jacques to move to Australia and marry me. We originally got told 13-18 months for the visa processing time. This has been the biggest trial I have been through in my life, and the thing that has challenged my faith most.

I had to resist the temptation to let myself spiral into panic and despair at the idea that the visa would take the full 18 months and I wouldn’t be able to handle it, or worse, that his application would get denied. There were frequent tears and moments of wallowing in self-pity and doubt.

So after gathering the money (with the help of both our amazing parents) and organising all of our paperwork, on the 28th of November 2017 we applied and paid for the visa. God had already spoken to me quite a while ago, telling us to go for this particular visa and that it would get approved. As I saw other couples spending way less time in separate countries while also waiting on immigration, I wondered if we were somehow doing things wrong. But I had to keep coming back to the word that I knew God had spoken.

About four months ago while I was praying I felt God give me the month April and I figured that it was most likely for when the visa would get approved. But logically this was crazy. Immigration had said a 13 month (which was later lowered to 10 months) minimum and even if it was approved at the very end of April it would only be five months. We would need a miracle. It stretched Jacques’ faith because I had heard God say that, not him, but he faithfully prayed into it anyway, being the godly man and wonderful fiancé that he is.

On the 11th of April 2018, Jacques’ 22nd birthday, Jacques came back from Crossfit with his best friend Graeme, cold, tired and not overly happy. His mum Carolle describes the boys this way when they came into the house. She said they walked into Jacques’ room and about five minutes later she just hears this ‘roaring’ coming from the room. She knew it could only mean one thing.

The visa had been approved in four and a half months. A while ago I wrote an article on the perfect ways of God and this proves it because not only did he perform a miracle for us by approving the visa in record time, he gave it to Jacques as a birthday present. He really is the God of the above and beyond, of the more than we can ask, think or imagine.

Possibly the most baffling part is that two days before the visa got approved, Immigration contacted us asking for extra information. We didn’t even give them all the information and then two days later it was just granted.

Wow. I am blown away by the power, the majesty, the goodness of God. How perfect and personal He is.

So I would like to publicly honour Jesus and thank Him for bringing Jacques and I together, for making a way for us and performing miracles on our behalf. For being the glue that holds us together and for giving meaning and purpose to our lives.

There is truly no one like our God.

Sincerely
Lil

___________________________________________________________________________________________

Image: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhasSpSBdEE, sourced 15 April 2018.

Hamster Wheel

hamster wheel sale

I haven’t really had a Saturday off in almost nine years. Next year I will have been in the retail industry for a decade. Starting when I was 16 at an independently owned business in my hometown, I changed companies a few times and progressed to management.

About a year ago, the weekends at work really started to bug me. I always say that on a Monday, my RDO as a manager, everyone is tired, angry and broke (because all the fun happens on a Saturday). I got tired of missing out on things and tallying up the amount of parties, beach trips, baby showers and engagement parties that I had missed over the years. I couldn’t stop.

As many times as I tried to push it aside and focus on the good of my job (amazing company culture, great co-workers and bosses, free clothes…) I would break down about once a month, or once every two weeks—overwhelmed by the feeling that, despite my best efforts, my career didn’t seem to be going anywhere.

Let me set the scene… On top of working full time hours I was also writing for a stationery company on the side, doing an enormous amount of work for a local TV station, going to church, home group and prayer meeting, leading the youth group, being part of the music team and learning keyboard, trying to maintain a long distance relationship, applying and saving for a visa, keeping a workout schedule at the gym, and trying to have a social life.

Rest? you might ask. When did I do that? My answer: I didn’t. When I would answer my dad’s question of ‘how are you?’ with ‘busy and tired’ he would say, ‘I’m hearing that a lot lately.’ My fiancé Jacques continually asked me if for some reason I hated sleep (believe it or not, I don’t).

As a single girl, out of all the things that I thought might be an issue in my relationship when I finally found an amazing guy to spend my life with (and thank you Jesus I did), the inability to rest was not it. Not even close. I had considered a lot of other things popping up as potential roadblocks, but this one totally blindsided me. When you’re single and living away from home you can get away with a lot more self-destructive behaviour (I’ll sleep when I’m dead, right?).

So I felt stuck in my career—like I absolutely couldn’t move on. I had complete a three year bachelor degree, applied for writing jobs for three years after that and gotten two interviews. In both situations they gave the job to someone with more experience.

Ever been faced with that old catch-22 of needing experience to get a job but then no one giving you a job, so you’re unable to gain said experience? It’s infuriating.

I felt constantly at the end of my tether, I had lost my love for my customers and some things were starting to slip. My boss came to me one day—she has got to be one of the most amazing ladies I’ve ever worked for—and sat me down as a friend to tell me that I was overloaded and burning out. “Something’s gotta give,” she said. As she spoke it suddenly dawned on me why I’d gotten sick more times this year than the last five years combined. Duh, you’re probably thinking, but it wasn’t obvious to me until that moment.

What I realised is that every time I rest I feel guilty, like I’m being lazy. I once heard laziness described as a rest you haven’t earned. But here I was getting sick because I’d worked myself down to the bone. At what point do we stop feeling selfish for taking care of our bodies? For me it took a significant other coming into my life to show me that I needed to slow down and listen to my body, but it doesn’t have to for you.

Six weeks ago I made the decision to step down from my full-time store manager role and drop back to casual.

Oh, I forgot to tell you the good news! The luxury stationery company that I’ve been working for on the side offered me two days a week with them, making it financially possible to free up my schedule and take on a casual role.

And guess what?

I feel the happiest I’ve felt in ages.

Everyone keeps commenting on how happy and relaxed I am. The other day I said to Jacques, “Lil’s back!” If he wasn’t sure what his hyped up fiancée meant, it means that suddenly now when customers walk in I feel a smile automatically burst onto my face—I want to go the extra mile for them. I’m suddenly starting to think about all the messages I haven’t replied to on Facebook, and wondering how are my friends in America going? I feel my creativity starting to come back, now that I have some brain space. Last weekend I was able to go visit my hometown. I drove down on Saturday morning and called up a bunch of friends. Guess what? They were all free. Of course they were. People are free on Saturdays. I felt a freedom and a joy again that had crept away so slowly and so silently that I hadn’t even noticed them leave the room.

I feel like me, and I like it.

I no longer feel that sense of striving, that nagging feeling of failure riding on my back, whispering in my ear in my weakest moments. I feel like my career is finally moving forward. The fact that it’s baby steps doesn’t bother me one tiny bit.

ferris bueller life moves fast

So how is your schedule looking? If you’d have to turn sideways to fit between the gaps, maybe you should do some rearranging. Or blow some big holes in that thing. Resting should not just be a concept. Friends should not just be those people you forgot to reply to. And your hometown (filled with dear friends and family) shouldn’t just be a place that you used to visit.

“He brought me out into a spacious place. He rescued me because he delighted in me.” – 2 Samuel 22:20 (NIV)

Create some space for your soul. Because without it, it withers. And the world does not need more withered souls, believe you me.

 

Sincerely,
Lil

 

Sources:
Image 1: https://www.thestartupsessions.com/blog/jumping-off-the-hamster-wheel-and-finding-your-sweet-spot/, accessed 20 March 2018.

Image 2: https://ahora3jradio.com/35667/ferris-bueller-life-moves-pretty-fast-quote/ferris-bueller-life-moves-pretty-fast-quote-adorable-download-ferris-bueller-life-moves-pretty-fast-quote-homean-quotes/, accessed 20 March 2018.

Are you using technology … or is it using you? Part 1

Meet and Tweet Crop

“Has social media really made us more connected? A sight I see often today is a family sitting at a café: dog barking, baby crying and everyone else . . .  glued to their screens. If this isn’t ringing any bells, what’s the first thing you do when you wake up in the morning? If it’s not checking some social media platform on your phone or tablet I will be surprised…”

To read the full article on Teen Talk Production’s page by blogger Lil Williams, follow the link below…

http://www.teentalkproduction.com.au/are-you-using-technology-or-is-it-using-you/

As For God

I’ve been meditating on the perfect ways of God recently. My fiancé and I are going through our toughest test of faith to date, waiting for a visa that will allow us to live in the same country and get married. The website says the processing time can be anywhere up to 17 months. We are currently one month down. We can’t start planning our wedding because we don’t have a date, which everything hinges on. We watch as many of our Facebook friends get married and post about a wedding date countdown for 2018 and we don’t know if we will be able to do the same.

But instead of fixating on the time (the when, when WHEN?! will drive you insane) I am learning to fixate on the God of the timing.

“As for God, his way is perfect. The word of the Lord is flawless. He is a shield for all who take refuge in him.” – 2 Samuel 22:31 (NIV)

I remember being arrested by this chapter in the Bible five years ago in a college laundry room, reading it over and over until it became one of my favourite passages.

Perfect. Who of us has perfect ways? Who can claim to be a person without error or folly, someone who has never made a mistake and has nothing to be embarrassed by? The idea is actually difficult for the human brain to comprehend.

I have neatly packaged timelines in my head that I would love God to adhere to, especially when it comes to the date of my wedding. If you had asked me when I was 18, I wanted to get married at 18. As the years changed, so did the ideal age. But looking back now, I was so immature and ill-prepared at 18, and my choice at the time would have led to devastation.

God in his goodness said no to my prayers. Said, “Not yet. Wait.”

Wait.

That word we all hate, but as I looked through the Bible in this time of waiting for Jacques, I have realised (much to my disappointment) that waiting is indeed a very biblical thing. Many people in the Bible waited many years for God’s promises to be fulfilled (at least I don’t expect to be waiting 400 years to marry Jacques).

Because waiting builds character. And God loves to build character in his kids. It occurred to me some time ago that patience is not a lesson that can be learned quickly.

“’For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are my ways your ways,’ declares the Lord. ‘As the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways and my thoughts higher than your thoughts.” – Isaiah 55:8-9 (NIV)

I was stressing out and becoming so negative about our situation, feeling like everybody had it easier than us (of course focussing on the couples around me who live in the same town) and felt that I couldn’t handle the maximum waiting time for the visa, like I would explode.

It’s funny how people can talk to you for hours and then God can say one or two sentences and it completely transforms your mind.

“I am not making you wait for nothing.”

Immediately a peace rushed into my heart. Ahh. There’s a point to it all. One of the things that was getting me the most worked up was that it felt like an arbitrary wait time from the government and that they had the final say on our wedding date, but God reminded me that he is in control.

“It is God who arms me with strength and makes my way perfect.” – 2 Samuel 22:33 (NIV)

He already knows the date of Jacques landing in Australia and our wedding. No government can thwart any plans of his. God also revealed that we were benefitting from the waiting, and I started to see all the changes that we as individuals, and as a couple, were experiencing monthly and even weekly.

I stopped focussing so much on the exact timing and the seeming unfairness of long distance, but the blessing in the wait, and the goodness and faithfulness of God. A friend encouraged me to prepare myself for the maximum processing time so that anything shorter felt like a bonus. God revealed to me that the question wasn’t whether I was strong enough to tough it out for 18 months, but did I trust that his grace was sufficient for me to wait 18 months if that was what he had ordained? It took the pressure off me and put it back on God, who can more than handle it.

“The tongue has the power of life and death, and those who love it will eat its fruit.”
– Proverbs 18:21

My mum encouraged me to start speaking out positive words about our visa situation every time someone asked (which is often), even if I didn’t feel positive, and see how that changed my mind set. My thoughts began to change and I stopped crying so much about the visa. I now feel entirely different than I did even three weeks ago because of declaring God’s goodness over the situation instead of giving in to self-pity and defeat.

The thing about God having perfect ways is that when we trust in him, as opposed to leaning on our own weak understanding, he makes our way perfect too. Not that everything in your life is suddenly roses (we still don’t have the faintest inkling of our wedding date) but that walking with Christ, clothed securely in Christ, spending time with him and trusting, is the definition of godly perfection.

“Be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect.” – Matthew 5:48

Sincerely
Lil

Crowds and Christmas

An interesting insight into anxiety and depression from my sister-in-law to be.

Marbles & Bottle caps

It’s that time of the year again – Christmas.

Don’t get me wrong, I love Christmas and what it represents but what I really battle with are the crowds in the malls. The hustle and bustle of the malls, people just about running over each other, is a bit overbearing.

I was shopping for Christmas gifts with my parents yesterday and oh boy, was the mall busy. People everywhere with their trollies full of gifts and children running around all excited, yet I just can’t find it within me to have the excitement that everyone else feels and has. While walking in the mall, I kept rubbing my fingers in my palms and kept saying “It’s okay, you’ll be fine. Just breath and think of a song to calm you down” For some reason and I just can’t wrap my head around it.

I battle with crowds and its only really…

View original post 256 more words

A Message to All Women

I just wanted to spread some encouragement to some amazing women I know and don’t know. You do not have to be they’ve said that you are.

“You are never too much,and you are always enough.” The sentence that still brings a tear to my eye when I hear it, over 5 years later.

Be blessed!

All credit to Carroll Gamboa, published on YouTube on 31 August 2017.

Sincerely
Lil

Is an arts degree truly the ‘bachelor of unemployment’?

7 things they didn’t tell me during an arts degree, or maybe I wasn’t listening…

bachelor unemployment

If you haven’t been listening either, maybe it’s time to start. Or maybe no one’s telling you these things that I had to figure out on my own.

During uni I never spent one minute worrying about finding a job once I was finished my degree. At the start of the course they gave us the impression that hundreds of companies were out there, just waiting to snuffle up graduates like us. Of course, a university would say that. At the beginning. How else do they lock in your fees?

And then at the end of my three years I found myself with a bachelor degree and no job. And no likelihood of getting one, if the first six months were any indication. I felt like Deakin had pulled one over on me. “You know all those jobs we told you were available at the start of your degree? Psych! There are none. Thanks for all the cash! Cheers, bye xx.”

I felt like there was no follow up, no nurturing or preparing for the real world once the training wheels of university were removed. (In high school, they refer to uni as the ‘real world’—it’s not.) I looked on in envy at nurses and teachers who all got ‘placed’ in graduate jobs or internships. While it had seemed easy at the time that my degree didn’t contain a mandatory placement, now all of a sudden I felt ripped off. Where was my head start, my foot in the door?

3-5 years experience

And three years later I am still trying to get a foot, a pinky, in any arts door. I have applied for over 100 jobs by now, broadening my search further and further, and received two interviews.

What is wrong with me? Where did I go wrong? My sister used to joke about my arts degree, calling it the ‘Bachelor of Unemployment’. Boy, do I feel bad about teasing those philosophy majors now.

I spent a long time feeling like a failure, and still do some days. I have dreams of being a writer but instead I work in retail, the industry I started in when I was 16, never imagining I would still be here.

I chalk my first mistake up to naively turning down an internship that my journalism teacher offered to put me forward for. “No thanks, journalism isn’t really my thing” was my reply. Oh, silly girl.

That brings me to my first point.

1) Take any advantage or opportunity presented to you, even if it’s not your ideal job or expertise

Looking back now, I would jump at the opportunity to have interned for the Geelong Advertiser, especially before I had even completed my degree. At the end of the day, experience is experience. Nobody starts out in their dream job and I really regret turning down an opportunity to kick start my arts resume and make some worthy connections. You can have all the experience in the world (like I do in retail) but relevant industry experience is really all employers seem to look at.

2) If there is an option to do a placement or internship, always take it

I saw on the course guide in third year that we could do a placement. It sounded like fun until I saw that the university didn’t help you at all. You had to organise the placement by yourself. I had just come back from a six month exchange in the United States. Organising somewhere to live at such late notice was hard enough, let alone this. It seemed like too much effort, so I let the opportunity slide. I would advise any arts student to go to the effort of organising their own placement. If it’s not a course elective, organise one and ask for approval of credit from your faculty. Those contacts forged would be invaluable now. The phrase “it’s who you know” is truer today than ever before (in more industries than just the creative ones, but that’s another issue). I find it interesting that the only people from my course that now have writing related jobs are through family, friends, or previous volunteer experience.

any-minute-now

3) Keep in contact with your classmates and professors

Actively seek advice from your professors and follow what you can. If someone on the inside is going to be on your side, it’s your teacher. They may be able to make an introduction, put in a good word for you, or just give you some good tips on breaking into the industry. If they don’t offer it outright (let’s be honest, they have a lot on their plates), make an appointment to speak with them and pick their brains. Ask their tips and advice, also if they can put you in contact with anyone who might eventually be able to offer you an internship or job.

I remember asking the teacher of my Shakespeare class in third year whether it was worth doing an honours year after my bachelor degree. His response was, “Honestly, you’ll end up a year later with another piece of paper, a bigger HECS debt and still no job. The best advice I can give you is to get out there and gain industry experience. Get any job you can in your field and work your way up.”

And here I am still trying.

4) Be proactive and start early

Maybe you found a job straight out of uni. Congratulations. This article is not for you.

It is only after years of unsuccessful job hunting has made me so desperate that I am now seeking advice from all avenues. I wish so much that I could have started volunteering for companies during university. The problem was I didn’t realise how tough the job market is out there. There are scores of graduates for every one job being advertised. We are faced with the horrible catch-22 of needing experience to get your first job, but no one giving you a chance in order for you to gain experience. It is one of the more frustrating paradoxes that I have experienced.

Don’t wait to see first-hand if your field is tough. Start being proactive now. You’re only going to thank yourself later.

Get your work out there. If you’re a writer and don’t have a blog, start one. It is crucial in this day and age to have an online presence (more than your social media accounts, although those are crucial too). I currently have a personal blog, and am also writing a novel. An editor can’t publish your manuscript if you don’t have one ready to show them. There is no wrong time to spend time working on your craft and building up your portfolio. Write every day. Spend time journaling, responding to creative prompts, drafting scripts and stories and essays.

On social media, clean up your profiles. It’s naïve to think that employers these days don’t Google people. Make sure that your online profile presents you as a person that they would want to employ. Create connections with people and companies that you admire, and see where it could lead, particularly with LinkedIn.

Read like crazy. Anything and everything you can get your hands on. If you think learning stops once you’ve got that graduation certificate, you’ve got another thing coming. Read books and articles on the publishing industry, or whatever arts industry you are interested in. Knowledge is power.

Submit your work to places like magazines or online journals, but make sure you do your homework and read up on the kind of submissions they are currently looking for, otherwise you will be wasting your time.

5) Volunteer

While a part-time job in your industry during your degree is ideal (and you should definitely try this first), it’s not always realistic. I know it may not seem very glamorous, but working for free is a great way for a company to take a risk-free chance on you. Being willing to work for free also shows how much you want to be there. It also gets you that really valuable experience that seems to be necessary for any paying job these days. I volunteered for a food and lifestyle blog The World Loves Melbourne for just over a year and am currently doing the blog, Instagram and newsletter for a program on Channel 31. It’s great, but I could have done more.

Yes, it is exhausting to volunteer while working a full time job but at the end of the day, it might be the only pathway to someone giving you a full time job in your field. Unfortunately, us arts kids often have to take the scenic route. Don’t let it get you too down. I had originally thought that volunteering was not an option open to me once I started full time work (I am currently in retail management) but one of my friends in the TV industry pointed out that I could volunteer one afternoon a week, or fortnight. I hadn’t thought about it like that before, assuming it was all or nothing, but anything is better than nothing.

getting serious

6) Use your connections

Networking. Half the time the word sends shivers down my spine because frankly, the whole concept makes me kind of uncomfortable. To some people like my fiancé Jacques, networking seems to come naturally. I’ve already mentioned lecturers and tutors, but think about the other people you have in your life who could connect you with a potential employer.

Research some networking events in your city and attend them. I recommend going with a friend as I admit that they can start out somewhat awkward, but they can be really worthwhile. If you know anyone successful in your field, ask to make a time to sit down with them and pick their brains. They’re obviously doing something right.

7) Don’t be proud

I know it’s not the millennial way of thinking, but in most careers, people have worked their way up from the bottom. This requires patience, perseverance, perhaps a salary cut, hard work and humility. If you’re looking to jump the queue, so to speak, and step straight into a senior role, you need to wake up. You might have to take a lower paying job that you intended, but you have to start somewhere. Don’t be too good for any job. Any job in your industry should be a good enough starting point.

I know it’s hard out there. Believe me, I know. And I don’t have a writing job yet, so you might be justified if you don’t take any of my advice. But I’m sure that I’m closer now than I’ve ever been.

Best of luck! May you land a job quicker than I did.

Sincerely
Lil

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Sources (accessed 30 November 2017):
https://www.careers24.com/career-advice/job-hunting/help-i-need-work-experience-20151215

https://www.socialtalent.com/blog/recruitment/the-best-job-seeker-memes-of-all-time-part-3

https://business.linkedin.com/talent-solutions/blog/2015/05/11-funny-memes-for-when-recruiting-gets-tough

http://www.quickmeme.com/meme/3phyao